Mercedes-Benz CVs

  • Stuttgart/Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), Aug 18, 2021 - On 18 August 1896 Gottlieb Daimler presented the very first motorised truck in the world. It was sold by Daimler to British Motor Syndicate, an automobile company in London.
  • Stuttgart, Oct 29, 2020 - Reconstruction, economic miracle and a new desire for travel: the Mercedes-Benz L 6600 heavy-duty truck and the Mercedes-Benz O 6600 bus, equipped with the same drivetrain, were the ideal vehicles for all this and more from 1950 right into the mid-1960s.
  • Stuttgart, Dec 17, 2010 - It was two things mainly which in 1985 set Mercedes-Benz on course towards the truck of the future. They were the new OM 442 A and OM 442 LA engines and the new EPS gearshift mechanism. The abbreviation initially stood for ‘electro-pneumatic gearshift system’ and subsequently for ‘Electronic Power Shift’.
  • Stuttgart, May 20, 2010 - 1948 Mercedes-Benz owner’s manual for one of the most unusual vehicles ever to leave the company’s production halls referred to it as the “three-tonne Opel Blitz”, with the addendum “Daimler-Benz licensed reproduction”. Colourful in character despite a less than glamorous appearance, and ground-breaking at the same time, the three-tonne Opel Blitz was given the designation L 701 at Mercedes-Benz.
  • Stuttgart, Apr 30, 2010 - The comparative test drive began in the early morning. The starting point was the main gate of the Daimler assembly plant in Wörth. The tour was 542 kilometres long, leading via Stuttgart over the San Bernardino pass to the Swiss village of Lostallo. The two test vehicles were worlds apart: a modern Actros semitrailer/tractor combination rated at 440 hp competing against a 200 hp LP 1620 with trailer. The two vehicles are separated by around 50 years of progress resulting from development work in the field of commercial vehicles.
  • Stuttgart, Apr 30, 2010 - The European Union was still called the European Economic Community (EEC), Europe's best-known politicians were Konrad Adenauer, Charles de Gaulle and Nikita Khrushchev. On the cusp of the 1960s, the economy in western Europe at least had overcome the aftermath of the Second World War and many countries were beginning to flourish once again. Western Europe was growing closer, with previously bitter enemies becoming partners or even friends. A solid border divided western and eastern Europe into two blocs.
  • Stuttgart, Apr 22, 2009 - A false start that turned out well in the end. The history of the 300 engine series, launched in 1949 for light and medium-duty commercial vehicles, was certainly not without drama.
  • Stuttgart/Wörth, Apr 1, 2009 - Though it was a momentous event, nobody was too surprised when Daimler-Benz followed the construction-site trucks with its new generation of road vehicles. But in fact this firmly established those particular contours that gave this vehicle generation its extraordinary format.
  • Stuttgart, Feb 12, 2009 - Just one year after the new cab-over-engine trucks of the LP series came on the scene in 1963, they and their snub-nosed colleagues got new engines. After a good 40 years, Daimler-Benz bid farewell to the precombustion chamber principle which was introduced in 1923, introducing direct injection in 1964 in the shape of two new in-line six-cylinder engines.
  • Stuttgart, Feb 5, 2009 - The new short-nosed trucks from Daimler-Benz, first presented to the press in March 1959, started out as a compromise on wheels. In order to promote the conveyance of goods by rail, Transport Minister Seebohm made life difficult for the truck: New, very stringent regulations concerning weights and dimensions spelt the end for the traditional conventionals, which had become the object of criticism for taking up too much valuable space on the roads with their long cowls.
  • Stuttgart, Apr 1, 2008 - The OE agricultural tractor chugged into the limelight at the 1928 International Motor Show (IAMA) and on to its buyer in May that year. It was vastly superior to its contemporary competitors in terms of economic efficiency, but in engineering terms, too, it was one of the most matured designs of the 1920s.
  • Stuttgart, Feb 25, 2008 - Only minor modifications to the well-established 3.5-ton Mercedes-Benz L 3500 were made to increase its payload to 4.5 tons from March 1953, and turn what had accordingly become the L 4500 medium-duty truck into the best-seller among the short-nose truck models from Mannheim.
  • Stuttgart, Jan 11, 2008 - The new generation of semitrailer tractors from Daimler-Benz arrived on the scene at just the right time for industry. At the Berlin Motor Show from February 11 until 23, 1993, the company presented models LZ 4000, LZ 6000 and LZ 8000 for the three payload categories of four, six and eight tons.
  • Stuttgart, Feb 7, 2007 - <b>March 11-20, 1932</b> At an extremely difficult time, Daimler-Benz AG dared to take the step of extending its commercial vehicle range further than ever before by, for the first time, offering a diesel engine as standard in the so-called high-speed truck. The light-duty truck presented at the Geneva Motor Show in 1932 was called Lo 2000.
  • Stuttgart, Oct 11, 2006 - <b>November 1956</b> The L 326 - a conventional truck which at least externally was difficult to distinguish from the familiar L 315. In terms of its inner values, however, the L 326 represented a quantum leap ahead, catching up with the competitors’ most powerful vehicles.
  • Stuttgart, Jul 13, 2006 - Develop a powerful tractor for as many applications as possible, one easy to operate by a single person and based on the proven concept of the Unimog: that was the idea pursued since 1967 by Gustav Krettenauer, agricultural engineer at the Daimler-Benz Gaggenau plant, and his team. High tractive power at low speed: that was now the most important thing in large-scale farming.
  • Stuttgart, Dec 26, 2005 - <b>January, 26, 1981</b> What is matter-of-course standard equipment on commercial vehicles from Mercedes-Benz today was a big step towards greater traffic safety in 1981: the first anti-lock braking system (ABS) for commercial vehicles.
  • Stuttgart, Aug 29, 2005 - <b>October 1950</b> At Daimler-Benz, the first newly developed heavy-duty truck after the war was the L 6600.
  • Stuttgart, Apr 26, 2005 - <June 1955</b> The first ex-factory COE truck, the LP 315, made its debut in June 1955. The basic vehicle had been no lesser truck than the long-distance bestseller L 315, derived from the L 6600 which in turn had been the first newly designed truck after the war.
  • Stuttgart, Apr 20, 2004 - <b>May 20, 1949:</b> As the company’s first post-war commercial vehicle development, the light-duty L 3250 truck celebrated its premiere in May 1949, at the Export Fair in Hanover.
  • Stuttgart, May 7, 2003 - The three-axle LP 333 sixteen-tonner was a made-to-measure truck – an adroit response to the dimensional and weight restrictions introduced in 1958 and a configuration that stood out for its maximum payload capacity. It also helped the cab-over-engine principle to its breakthrough.
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